Lynne's Book Notes


Apr 23rd at 8AM / via: lauriehalseanderson / op: sabhong / 47,626 notes

lauriehalseanderson:

Now get thee hence…

(Source: sabhong)


Apr 19th at 10PM / via: teenlibrariantoolbox / op: hawwkette / 19,281 notes

(Source: hawwkette)


"The first thing this librarian needs to understand is that the bookmobile doesn’t belong to her. It belongs to the public, including children." 

Pat Scales responds regarding a ‘conservative’ librarian who wants to keep “Wimpy Kid” and “Captain Underpants” out of the bookmobile that she mans.

SLJ Columnist Pat Scales Addresses Censorship Concerns in Libraries | School Library Journal

(via schoollibraryjournal)


millionsmillions:

Sofia Coppola will direct a live adaptation of “The Little Mermaid.” No, not the Disney version, but the Hans Christian Andersen one. Expect something darker than singing crabs.

millionsmillions:

Sofia Coppola will direct a live adaptation of “The Little Mermaid.” No, not the Disney version, but the Hans Christian Andersen one. Expect something darker than singing crabs.


The Common Core Vs. Books: When Teachers Are Unable to Foster a Love of Reading in Students 

mzchristie:

By 

How did you develop a love for reading?

Ask George SaundersBarry Hannah, or Andrea Barrett. For each of these writers, their love for reading was realized in a K-12 classroom. For Maya Angelou, it’s thanks in part to Miss Kirwin, a “brilliant teacher” at the George Washington High School in San Francisco. For John McPhee, it’s thanks in part to Olive McKee, an English teacher he had for three years. Of course, you don’t have to look to lauded authors. Most readers, writers, and book-lovers can point you to a moment in their educational journeys where a love for reading was inspired in them by a passionate K-12 teacher.

However, the ability of schools and teachers to foster a love for reading in students is under assault in today’s educational climate. We live in a time of high-stakes accountability, where quantifiable metrics, namely standardized test scores, are used to judge students, teachers, and schools. Now, we are faced with the Common Core, new standards in Math and English Language Arts that are sweeping the nation. Incentivized by billions in federal grant dollars, 45 states are adopting the Common Core, with some states rolling out their implementations over the last two school years and other states waiting until next school year.

Read More

(Source: ala-con)


Hemingway’s writing desk in Key West

She says what I have done so far isn’t in the least what I was wanted to do. I am asked to tell the story of the Diamond, and, instead of that, I have been telling the story of my own self. Curious, and quite beyond me to account for. I wonder whether the gentlemen who make a business and a living out of writing books, ever find their own selves getting in the way of their subjects, like me?

— Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone


lareviewofbooks:

lareviewofbooks:

In honor of Banned Books Week, LARB wants to know: Out of all the books that have been banned or challenged in the 21st century, from To Kill a Mockingbird to the Twilight Saga, which of those controversial tomes is your personal favorite?
For example, Catch-22 by Joseph Heller is one of our favorites — Heller’s surrealistic, cynical satire on wartime bureaucracy was banned in Strongsville, Ohio and challenged in both Dallas, Texas and Snoqualmie, Washington for its use of vulgar language. What gives this American classic its place of honor on our bookshelves is Heller’s free-wheeling style and his outlandishly offbeat cast of characters, as he accuses modern life of being completely insane.
Check here for 2013’s most banned and challenged books, and let us know! Tell us in a reblog or in the answer box, and we’ll post the answers we like best on Sunday evening. 
So, which banned or challenged book is your favorite, and why?

Tonight is the last night of Banned Books Week and we’ve received some great answers so far, so keep them coming! 

My favorite is Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian. The story of Junior’s first year in high school, in a white high school off the rez, is full of boyhood on the verge of manhood, of striving despite dire poverty, of family love that always breaks your heart and of true friendship.

lareviewofbooks:

lareviewofbooks:

In honor of Banned Books Week, LARB wants to know: Out of all the books that have been banned or challenged in the 21st century, from To Kill a Mockingbird to the Twilight Saga, which of those controversial tomes is your personal favorite?

For example, Catch-22 by Joseph Heller is one of our favorites — Heller’s surrealistic, cynical satire on wartime bureaucracy was banned in Strongsville, Ohio and challenged in both Dallas, Texas and Snoqualmie, Washington for its use of vulgar language. What gives this American classic its place of honor on our bookshelves is Heller’s free-wheeling style and his outlandishly offbeat cast of characters, as he accuses modern life of being completely insane.

Check here for 2013’s most banned and challenged books, and let us know! Tell us in a reblog or in the answer box, and we’ll post the answers we like best on Sunday evening. 

So, which banned or challenged book is your favorite, and why?

Tonight is the last night of Banned Books Week and we’ve received some great answers so far, so keep them coming! 

My favorite is Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian. The story of Junior’s first year in high school, in a white high school off the rez, is full of boyhood on the verge of manhood, of striving despite dire poverty, of family love that always breaks your heart and of true friendship.


"My way of satisfying myself is really simple. I try not to count anything: words, pages, hours at the work site. They vary wildly over time, anyway. Sure, if I write three pages instead of half a page, I notice it, I’m pretty excited. But I work every day. If I do that, all the other counting, all the other considerations can melt away. I just make sure I make contact with the book every day. And it gets done." 

Sep 29th at 11AM / via: themissourireview / op: mttbll / 115 notes

Jonathan Lethem (via mttbll)

(Source: thedailybeast.com)


Sep 28th at 7PM / 0 notes

Will and Sally searched for adventure together nearly every day. They knew exactly what adventure looked like because of the storybooks Will read. Giants. Monsters. Cake. That was what the knights in the storybooks always found on their adventures.

Well, Will had added the cake part himself, but it really did belong in any good adventure.

— Lisa Graff, A Tangle of Knots


Sep 15th at 12PM / via: libraryjournal / op: idea-lab / 69 notes
libraryjournal:

Yowzah!

libraryjournal:

Yowzah!

(Source: idea-lab)